Announcing Evening Drop-In Support Hours (Starting February 8th, 2017)

W.O.M.A.N, Inc. is  pleased to announce that we will be offering an additional window of drop-in hours on Wednesday evenings. We hope that this may help to make our services accessible to folks who are unable to attend daytime hours.
STARTING WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8TH, 2017
OUR DROP-IN SUPPORT HOURS WILL BE AS FOLLOWS:
WEDNESDAYS
11:00AM – 12:30PM
5:00PM – 6:30PM (NEW)
FRIDAYS
2:00PM – 3:30PM
LOCATION: W.O.M.A.N., INC. OFFICE, 26 BOARDMAN PLACE, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94103

During drop-in support times, survivors of domestic violence, their friends and/or their family members can meet with a trained advocate for in-person support. In this meeting, we provide peer counseling, safety planning, and referrals. Additionally, survivors, their friends and/or family can learn more about W.O.M.A.N., Inc. services such as our peer support groups, Latinx Program, and therapy.

Drop-in support sessions are offered in English and Spanish.

To learn more, please visit our website at www.womaninc.org/support
For immediate assistance, please call our 24/7 Support Line at (415)864-4722
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W.O.M.A.N., Inc. tiene el placer de anunciar una ventana adicional de horas de apoyo los Miércoles por la noche. Esperamos que esto ayude hacer que nuestros servicios sean más accesibles a las personas que no puedan asistir durante el día.

Empezando Miércoles, Febrero, 8 2017

Nuestras horas de apoyo serán las siguientes:

Miércoles
11:00 AM- 12:30PM
5:00 PM- 6:30PM (NUEVO)

Viernes
2:00PM – 3:30PM

Lugar: OFICINA WOMAN INC., 26 BOARDMAN PLACE, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94103

Horas de apoyo serán ofrecidas en Ingles y Español.

Para más información, por favor visite http://www.womaninc.org/support

Para asistencia inmediata, por favor llame a nuestra 24/7 línea de apoyo (415)864- 4722

Support W.O.M.A.N., Inc., Get a 2017 Pet Calendar!

Friends! We are excited to let you know the calendar is now in the works & available for order! Thanks to your submissions, next year’s calendar is full of love & sweet faces. We loved hearing about the healing & pure joy your animal companions bring to your lives.

Sure to be an awesome gift for yourself and/or loved ones, you can reserve your 2017 W.O.M.A.N., Inc. Pet Calendar here
Owning a pet and experiencing domestic violence adds an additional layer of complexity to the situation. The abusive partner may withhold money to pay for the animal’s food and water. When attempting to leave, a survivor might be denied housing and/or shelter access because the location does not accommodate pets. We have a fund that hopes to address some of these issues. The proceeds from our pet calendar sales will go back our Pet Fund which helps with food/water costs, kennel stays and more for pets whose humans have experienced domestic violence. 

Want a calendar, but wish to make a general donation to our programs and services? Make a donation of at least $30 $15 here, and indicate in the dedication notes that you would like a pet calendar!

Sneak peek below!

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Why Pet Calendar? Follow this link to learn more. 

 

Program Highlight: Echando Pa’lante

Echando Pa’lante (EPL), which translates to “Moving Forward”,started out as a support group for monolingual Spanish speakers.. It was born out of a group of survivors who were no longer in crisis but still needed resources to help them beyond their domestic violence situation. They also wanted to keep a connection to the agency. This group would meet once a month with various topics that would range Sucesses_Echando P'alante.jpgfrom yoga sessions, art activities, and presentations from outside agencies.

EPL is continues to meet once a month but participants felt like they needed to do more to give back to the agency that helped them so much.  As a result of this, the EPL Leadership training took flight. In this process of becoming trained domestic violence advocates, members gained skills in the following areas: outreach, facilitating art based support groups, peer counseling, domestic violence prevention education, and the 40 hour domestic violence training.
EPL 2.jpeg

Echando Pa’lante has grown so much and will continue to expand and grow. In the long run, EPL member’s hopes are to expand the training and spread awareness about domestic violence to their community in hopes that one day there will be no more violence.

Adilia Preciado, Echando Pa’lante Coordinator

How to Participate in Domestic Violence Awareness Month This October

  1. Knowledge is power! Educate yourself about healthy and unhealthy relationships.ch1-graph2Learn about the additional barriers people from different communities face when experiencing domestic violence. Challenge traditional ideas of domestic violence & squash misconceptions. Read about how different patterns of violence intersect with one another. Spread that knowledge around!
  2. Wear purple, the domestic violence awareness color. Show your support by adding some purple to your ensembles this October.
  3. Donate!
    • If you’re interested in supporting W.O.M.A.N., Inc.:
      1. Allstate’s Purple Purse Challenge! We are excited to be selected to  participate in this annual event, a nation-wide fundraiser to raise awareness of financial abuse & to promote economic empowerment. We have a chance to win $100,000 and would love to garner your support in our cause. Click here to find out how you can get involved.
      2. Contribute to our Pet Fund! Anyone who donates $25+ to the Pet Fund will receive a 2017 W.O.M.A.N., Inc. Pet Calendar
  • We are amongst a plethora of bay area anti-violence agencies. Find one you support, and contribute to the cause. Any little bit helps.

4.  Attend an event near you! Domestic violence agencies from all around the country will be hosting events to honor DV awareness month. Participating in one is an easy way to be apart of the movement.

5. Contact a local domestic violence agency to learn more about domestic violence and what you can do to help.

  • Interested in getting involved? Check out our volunteer opportunities!
  • Engage. Educate. Empower! W.O.M.A.N., Inc. is offering a free workshop on how to support survivors of domestic violence. supporting-survivors-ces

6. Talk about it! Don’t be afraid to initiate conversations about domestic violence awareness. With that said, part of being a good ally is to do your best to exercise non-judgmental love and support. If someone opens up to you about their experience with abuse, actively listen and believe the survivor when they are brave enough to speak their truth. Here are some tips on disclosure to keep in mind when dealing with those experiencing domestic violence:

disclosures

7. Take action on social media! The internet is FULL of stuff to get involved with. Share with your networks why you’re standing up against DV this month, start/participate in awareness campaigns (Examples: SurvivedAndPunished, NoMore, CPEDV Calendar, #SeeDV). So many ways to show your support just from your computer at home.

Remember, domestic violence is a community issue. You can have a role in ending domestic violence. Learn more about ways you can help:

 

If you feel you or someone you know may be experiencing abuse, please feel free to give our support line a call at (415)864-4722. We are here for you 24/7.

www.womaninc.org | womaninc.wordpress.com 

 

 

W.O.M.A.N., Inc. is Having a Pop-Up Healing Hearts with Art Group!

pop-up-art-group

Invite friends on facebook!

*Featured art on the flyer created through A Window Between Worlds.

Announcing New W.O.M.A.N., Inc. Support Groups! | Fall 2016

Support Group Flyer Fall 2016

– Note that these are drop-in groups rather than ongoing (closed) groups; participants may attend any or all complete sessions during the series.
–  There is a suggested donation of $2 to $20 for each group. You are invited to donate if you wish.
–  One or more sessions may be canceled/modified due to holidays; in that event, participants will be notified in advance.

If you have any concerns about your safety in attending either group, we are happy to talk with you more about that and assist with any safety planning you might want; please call our 24 hour Support Line at (415)864-4722

Supporting LGBTQ Survivors

Contributed by former W.O.M.A.N., Inc. volunteer, Jessica Hoh

Talking about intimate partner violence remains a dirty secret in any community, however within LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) communities discussing this issue is often shrouded with additional layers of shame and stigma. Research suggests that LGBTQ individuals experience higher amounts of violence in general, poverty, incarceration, poverty, suicide, and, unfortunately intimate partner violence as well. These rates are even higher amongst LGBTQ people of color.abuseawareness-ribbon-ctsy-messerwoland-wikimedia-commons

By now it’s commonly understood why LGBTQ communities experience higher rates of oppression: homophobia and transphobia incur bullying, bashing, higher rates of unemployment, etc. With these oppressions, it’s understandable that many LGBTQ individuals seek refuge and safety within queer spaces. Often LGBTQ individuals rely heavily on queer community, especially when their family of origins fail to provide them support and/or safety. These networks can become very powerful, beautiful and healing spaces.

However, we know intimate partner abuse does occur within LGBTQ relationships with
rates similar, (and certain studies report higher rates), to heterosexual couples.
When abuse does occur many survivors are at a loss for what to do, for many reasons. Some of those reasons include:

  • Misunderstanding gender dynamics of abuse: Cultural norms often generalize abuse as occurring solely from male-identified persons towards women. When abuse dynamics look different than that narrative, recognizing occurring abuse can be confusing and challenging. Especially so if a more feminine identified individual is the abuser.
  • Fear of portraying LGBTQ individuals negatively: LGBTQ individuals are often pathologized and “othered.” LGBTQ folks may fear additional negative labels applied to their identities.
  • Distrust of social service agencies: Many LGBTQ survivors are wary when seeking outside assistance due to homophobia and transphobia. Survivors may fear inappropriate questions, disbelief that abuse occurred, and failure for agencies to take abuse seriously. Additionally, as of present, there are no shelters for male-identified survivors. So if someone in a gay relationship experiences violence, they may experience a harder time finding shelter. For transgender survivors, finding shelter of any kind may incur even more difficulties.
  • Fear of alienation from LGBTQ community: Survivors may fear coming forward with abuse because they believe their community will side with the abuser. While this fear occurs in all communities, many LGBTQ individuals have little or no familial support so LGBTQ friends/family may be all the social support they have.        

 

Despite these additional experiences many LGBTQ survivors may experience, there are various ways survivor advocates can be sensitive to these issues:

  • Don’t assume gender: When answering crisis-line calls or working with clients, we often automatically generate gender identities for folks based on appearances and/or vocal tones. Simply asking instead of assuming can eliminate mis-gendering (using incorrect pronouns/names) survivors.
  • Use gender-neutral language: Replace phrases including “ladies” and “guys” with “folks,” “friends,” “person/people,” etc.
  • Hands groupTake extra steps for transgender survivors: Transgender individuals have the highest rates of suicide, bashing, poverty, homelessness and incarceration. They additionally often experience more challenges when seeking emergency shelter. Remember that on top of experience partner abuse, they may also be dealing with a lot of additional oppressions.
  • Keep in mind LGBTQ survivors experience additional hurdles: Remember LGBTQ individuals may not be out to their friends, family and/or employers, they may rely solely on LGBTQ community for support and they may hold shame over being LGBTQ. Being knowledgeable and sensitive to these additional layers will help assist members of these communities better.

Ending domestic violence takes support from the entire community. W.O.M.A.N., Inc. continually strives to be inclusive and supportive to survivors from all walks of life, age groups, race and ethnic backgrounds, gender identities and sexual orientations. I’m proud to be affiliated with such a strong group of individuals working to end domestic violence in all forms.  Keep up the fantastic, amazing work!

Sources: 

1) Renzetti, Claire. Violence in Gay and Lesbian Domestic Partnerships. Chicago: Routledge Press, 1996.

2)  MacKenzie, G. O. Transgender Nation. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press., 1994.


Are you in need of support for yourself, an LGBT friend or family member? You are not alone! You can:

Call our support line at (415)864-4722 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Contact an LGBTQ specific domestic violence program: 

  • Community United Against Violence (CUAV): (415)777-5500
  • The Northwest Network LGBT Domestic Violence Hotline: (206)568-7777