W.O.M.A.N., Inc. Hybrid Domestic Violence Training

W.O.M.A.N., Inc. has modernized the way we offer our 40 hours domestic violence training. In December 2015, we received a grant from The Joseph and Vera Long Foundation to help develop a hybrid training that combines the use of online modules paired with intentional in person gatherings. After surveying multiple organizations throughout California W.O.M.A.N., Inc. decided to revamp the way we train our volunteers and community members. The traditional style of training required participants to attend up to ten in person session, many of them lecture based. Because of the required in person sessions, many volunteers were unable to make the commitment.

Using videos, quizzes, discussion forums and articles, each module covers the same content from the traditional training such as DV 101, Supporting LGBTQ Survivors, to Legal sections and Transformative Justice. The modules are broken up into several sections. Participants are given two weeks in between our in person gatherings to complete their modules therefore allowing participants the ease and flexibility to complete the modules at their own pace. The beauty of the online modules has also allowed us more time to talk about social justice and intersectionality. In doing so, we are able to be intentional about centering the experiences of survivors from marginalized communities.

While the in-person sessions are still required for training completion, we’ve cut our in-person time down to 4 in-person sessions, meeting on alternating weeks. Once participants complete their online modules, they come to each session ready to engage in discussion and activities on the topics covered in the modules. Agency representatives from the community also help facilitate portions of training to sharing their insight and expertise. Having participants complete the content portion of training prior to in-person sessions allows for more in-depth discussion on how to apply the knowledge they’ve gained on supporting survivors from various backgrounds. The hybrid training allows time for more skill building and practice while also being more culturally sensitive. Having the ability to cater to the various styles of adult learning provides each training participant has the opportunity to learn at their own pace and expand on their knowledge, skills, and understanding of how to support survivors of domestic violence.

The hybrid approach has proven to be a successful one for us. We recently received a grant which enabled us to translate all our online modules into Spanish. In the coming year, our goal is to further develop these materials and offer our first hybrid training in Spanish. We are currently seeking additional support in achieving this goal.

Below are a few testimonials from recent Hybrid Training graduates:

“The hybrid training offered by W.O.M.A.N., Inc. was a unique opportunity to learn about domestic violence. Combining individual modules to read at home with in person meetings, gave me the space to learn on my own and process everything then the space to discuss and reflect and form thoughts and concerns in a safe space, where everyone is heard. It’s a very efficient way to check privilege and assumptions. Another strong point of this training is getting to meet people from the domestic violence community. People who work in different programs that support survivors from shelters around the Bay Area, are in a unique position to give anyone who wants to work with survivors a picture of how it really looks like. It also gives a very realistic image about the life of survivors. A great insight that helps understand more about the community and bust a lot of myths surrounding domestic violence. I am grateful and thankful to have gone through this training. I feel I learned a lot and I can’t wait for learn more.”
– Ebtihal (Fall 2017)
“The hybrid training clearly illustrated the dynamics of domestic violence and the power and control techniques used by the abusers.  The training’s history was informative and enlightening for me. From the rule of thumb chastisement law whereby husbands could discipline and beat their wives; to the American history of oppression embedded in violence against women, against Native Americans and against other people of color or people who were different; to the unfair criminal, legal and prison systems of America today that perpetuate violence particularly when dealing with survivors who are people of color, LGBTQ or just different. All forms of DV and abuse was clearly and thoroughly reviewed as well as prejudices, sexism, racism and other oppressions. I was most impressed with how respectful the training was toward DV survivors, stressing meeting them where they are at, without making assumptions but treating all survivors with respect, dignity, showing compassion and mindfulness at all times regardless of preferences and differences. We are all humans and we all deserve to be treated as such. This training changed my perspective on many things, the lessons made me think about life in general and has made me a better person.”
– Zalise  (Summer 2017)

Interested in volunteering with us? Need to complete 40 hours of domestic violence training for work? Or would you just like to take the training for personal interest? Take a look at our volunteer opportunities here & fill out an application here*.

Don’t have time to volunteer, but want to support this work? Please consider making a small contribution today.

*Volunteer applications for our next training cycle are due Monday, January 8th, 2018.

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Meet a W.O.M.A.N., Inc. Volunteer: Samantha W.

1) How long have you been with W.O.M.A.N., Inc.?
I’ve been with W.O.M.A.N., Inc. since 2014… around three years.

2) Tell us a little bit about yourself?
 I’m someone who loves traveling, reading, and eating my way through San Francisco. I’m looking forward to adding the role of mother to my life soon too.
3) What is your role and what opportunities have you been involved with at the organization?
As a front-line crisis worker [on the 24/7 Support Line], I have had opportunities to connect with callers who are looking for help. This can range from figuring out whether their relationships are abusive, looking for emergency shelter, to learning more about legal options that exist in the Bay Area. I have also had opportunities to connect with other dedicated volunteers at fundraising efforts such as W.O.M.A.N. Inc.’s guest bartending nights.
4) What propelled you to volunteer with us & what motivates you to continue the anti-violence work you do?

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I started volunteering with an amazing anti-violence organization (Battered Women Support Services) in my hometown of Vancouver, Canada. My training there profoundly impacted my life, and propelled me to get an education in counseling psychology. When I moved to San Francisco, I wanted to continue connecting with smart, badass individuals who approach anti-violence work from an intersectional stance.
Even if I can’t make the biggest financial donation or dedicate as much time as I would like, doing something small and regular does make a difference. My motivation to continue the anti-violence work can be summed up by Margret Mead’s quote: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

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Thank you for supporting Dismantling & Rebuilding: An Evening for Stronger, Safer Communities!

We want to send a BIG thank you to everyone who supported Dismantling and Rebuilding: An Evening for Stronger, Safer Communities. On April 28th, we celebrating our Executive Director Jill Zawisza’s 20 years of leadership in the domestic violence field and her 10th anniversary with W.O.M.A.N., Inc. Dismantling & Rebuilding was about anti-oppression, intersectional feminism, collaboration across difference, and holding collective power. Inspired by the words of Audre Lorde, “the master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house,” the event sought to promote stronger, safer communities rooted in intersectionality and inclusion. Board, staff, volunteers and community members came together to celebrate with art, music, drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and a silent auction. With everyone’s support, the W.O.M.A.N., Inc. Board was able to put together a heartwarming and fun event that raised over $7,000 for domestic violence survivors, their friends and family.

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Grab a Drink With us! W.O.M.A.N., Inc. is Guest Bartending at Tonic Bar SF

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Drink for a cause! Meet our crew for some drinks and mingling at our guest bartending fundraiser. This is a great opportunity to 1) get connected with some fierce folks working to end domestic violence in our communities and 2) raise some critical funds for survivors their friends, and family.

When: Thursday, March 23rd | 6pm-9pm
Where: Tonic SF (2360 Polk Street, San Francisco)
Join us & invite your friends!

100% OF THE TIPS MADE BETWEEN 6PM – 9PM WILL BE DONATED TO W.O.M.A.N., INC

Entry is free! 

RSVP on our Facebook event here 

 

 

Outreach Boos at Lowell High School’s Love Fest

On February 17th, the W.O.M.A.N., Inc. Outreach team tabled at Lowell High School Wellness Center’s Love Fest.  Outreach Boos, Alicia Padillapaz and Shaena Spoor, were joined by folks from Hip Hop to Health , Planned Parenthood, LYRIC, JUMA, YAWAV, SFWAR, Huckleberry Youth Clinic and Hand to Hand Kajukenbo and Self Defense Center. Each organization brought their unique expertise to support and educate students on a variety of topics including reproductive health,  self defense and creating a culture of safety, consent and sex positivity.

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Left: W.O.M.A.N, Inc. Table; Right: Jaymie Frazier, Outreach Boo & School Counselor, participating in our Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month Activity

At the W.O.M.A.N., Inc. table, Alicia and Shaena engaged students with activities focused around healthy relationships. They provided two fill in the blank activities to choose from: Dating Bill  of Rights and #YouDeserve. When thinking about relationships, the primary focus is often on the “we/us” — it’s easy for folks to overlook individual wants and needs. While the “we” factor is important, seeing oneself as a whole, unique individual within the partnership is so crucial. The Dating Bill of Rights prompts participants to reflect on what their needs and “rights” are in a relationship. Students picked one thing they would include on their “Dating Bill of Rights” by completing the statement “I have the right to_________.”

“I have the right to have control over my body.

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Outreach Boos Present DV101 to SHCP’s Men’s Varsity Basketball Team

On Saturday, September 17th, W.O.M.A.N., Inc.’s Outreach Boo-Crew was invited to present to Sacred Heart Cathedral Prep’s Men’s Varsity Basketball team.  Here, presenters Annie, Jaymie, and Shaena educated these young gentlemen on the definition of domestic violence as well as its prevalence amongst teens.  The Outreach Boos facilitated rich discussions amongst the teammates to help them define healthy relationships, challenge misconceptions of teen relationships, and outline ways to support peers who may be experiencing domestic violence.  The presentation ended with an important activity called the “Dating Bill of Rights,” where participants learned how to set healthy boundaries in their own relationships.  To the Outreach Boo-Crew’s surprise, Sacred Heart Cathedral Prep’s Men’s Varsity Basketball team and coaches surprised them with various donations, including DVDs, toiletries, and a Wii console!  W.O.M.A.N., Inc. is truly thankful and appreciates the opportunity to collaborate with such a generous group!  We look forward to working with Sacred Heart Cathedral Prep in the future!
– Jaymie, Outreach Boo

Volunteer Highlight: Astrea Somarriba

1) When did you first get involved with W.O.M.A.N., Inc.?
I started volunteering for W.O.M.A.N., Inc. in October 2015.

2) What inspired you to do anti-violence work?

My freshman year of college, I traveled to Lima, Peru with a group of students to learn more about the street child phenomenon and how it intersects with sex work in the city. During this trip, we had the opportunity to speak with and learn from sex workers who shared their unique stories, strengths, and hopes for the future. This propelled me towards further examining women and sexual violence in areas that have witnessed conflict or hardship and led me to Thailand, Cambodia, Nicaragua, and Cuba. Many of the women I met shared similar experiences of abuse, but also demonstrated remarkable resilience, and I was eager to continue learning from and working with survivors of abuse back home in San Francisco.

3) What kind of opportunities have you been involved with here?
With W.O.M.A.N. Inc., I’ve had the opportunity to work the support line, and in the process, learn a lot about domestic violence resources in the Bay Area. Now, I’m constantly on the lookout for cool organizations and am excited to share what I’ve learned with friends and fellow advocates.unnamed

4) How has your involvement impacted your life?
Working the support line has taught me a lot about what it takes to be fully present for another person. I’ve learned the value of pauses and in finding answers to challenging questions together. It’s given me the chance to develop my listening and facilitation skills, and “check myself” and any assumptions I may have often.

5) What pieces of wisdom would you share with new volunteers or community members who are interested in supporting W.O.M.A.N., Inc.?
You may have extensive training to provide support to domestic violence survivors, but the survivor is the expert in their own life and the author of their own story. It’s an honor to be included in their journey, so enjoy the time you have with them and make sure to take time for yourself. Acknowledge when you need space and time to re-energize and reflect.

6) Can you share a fun fact about yourself?
I cannot whistle and have very little interest in learning at this point.


Astrea also writes for Young Minds Advocacy. Check out her recent piece illuminating the importance of cultural competency.